Collins Dictionary names ‘lockdown’ the word of the year, as if any of us needed a reminder

Collins Dictionary names 'lockdown' the word of the year, as if any of us needed a reminder

It’s been an unprecedented, weird year, hasn’t it? Now we’re in November, we can finally say, the end of 2020 is nigh. It can’t come soon enough. 

Before it does, one annual thing dictionaries love to do is declare a word of the year — a term that sums up the zeitgeist, the mood, or political events that defined the year in question. 

Which is why Collins Dictionary chose “lockdown” as its Word of the Year for 2020. Not that any of us need a reminder of the COVID-19 restrictions that played such a big role in our lives this year. 

In a blog post explaining the choice, Collins defined lockdown as “the containment measure implemented by governments around the world to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.” Lockdown orders have been issued either nationally or locally in many countries across the world since the outbreak of the coronavirus. Country-wide lockdowns since the beginning of the year have included New Zealand, France, and the UK, where England has just gone into its second lockdown. Read more…

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